Developing Social Skills in a Child with ADHD

Developing Social Skills in a Child with ADHD

Every parent wants their child to grow confidently, self-assured, and live within socially acceptable parameters. That’s why we all work so hard and worry each day that our children are soaking up the messages we provide them to develop their social skills. But children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder need a little extra care. So

Every parent wants their child to grow confidently, self-assured, and live within socially acceptable parameters. That’s why we all work so hard and worry each day that our children are soaking up the messages we provide them to develop their social skills. But children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder need a little extra care. So here is a brief guide to helping your child with ADHD develop social skills successfully.

Ensure Your Child is Socially Aware

Children with ADHD are not as adept at keeping their behaviors in check as those without. So they tend to lose sight of how to react to or even perceive certain social situations and how their reactions can affect others around them.

It can benefit a child with ADHD greatly when a parent actively teaches them how to self-monitor, evaluate, and make the necessary adjustments in any given situation. Even if you seek ADHD treatment for your child, while most children pick these skills up quickly, a child with ADHD will need that extra personal attention to achieve growth in their social development.

Extreme Patients Through Plenty of Practice

Because children with ADHD are more apt to fall into behaviour patterns that they are accustomed to, by reacting without thinking about any consequences, it’s important to call out the behaviour immediately and calmly. This requires instant feedback with clear instructions on how to improve on future similar situations. But it may require many attempts to see slight changes over time, so patience is critical, along with constant reminders and praise for positive results. 

To keep the child as prepared as possible for social interactions, practicing and role-playing at home, where it’s safe and private, can help instill new ways of dealing with situations that they can draw from. But group setting with peers can also be of great benefit as they can explore each others’ thoughts and practice new skills together.

Encourage One-On-One Time with Friends

As larger groups can sometimes be a hindrance for children with ADHD, as they can withdraw and make the wrong choices, it can be very beneficial to encourage playtime with a single friend. This will allow you to thoughtfully structure the time in a way that sets your child up for success.

Every early-year success can provide confidence that the ADHD child can use as a source for further positive growth as they become older and move through different developmental stages. Even children in high school can learn from one-on-one peer interaction and keep them from feeling completely isolated. 

Remain Involved with the School

As the old saying goes, it takes a village to raise a child, so stay connected with your child’s school to ensure your child with ADHD is not overrun by stigmas created by other children. It’s easy for children to be ridiculed and isolated by peers, especially for a child with ADHD who has difficulty with social interactions. So working closely with the school to ensure progress can lead to more acceptance and better behaviours by your child and his or her peers.

Chris Marks
ADMINISTRATOR
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